276°
Posted 20 hours ago

Tribes of The Wind | Strategy Game | Ages 14+ | 2 to 5 Players | 60 Minutes

£26.475£52.95Clearance
ZTS2023's avatar
Shared by
ZTS2023
Joined in 2023
82
63

About this deal

A cookie set by YouTube to measure bandwidth that determines whether the user gets the new or old player interface. One of the game’s most striking features is its beautiful artwork. The illustrations are not just aesthetically pleasing. They also serve to immerse players in the game’s post-apocalyptic, eco-friendlyworld. This visual appeal adds a layer of depth to the gaming experience. A Unique Twist on Card Play The game concludes when a player builds all five villages. Players then finish the current round and calculate their scores. The player with the most victory points wins the game. The Element of Strategy in Tribes of the Wind There's a game design term, the kludge, which I love. It refers to an extra mechanism or rule which is added to deal with a problem elsewhere in the system. The temples in Tribes of the wind are the perfect example of this phenomenon. At some point the designer seems to have realised that you can end up with a real bummer of a hand of cards, stalling your progress towards sylvan Nirvana. Placing a temple allows you to jettison three cards (and immediately replace them) while gaining an immediate benefit. Which is fine, but it's disconcerting to see the design 'joins' so clearly. The addition of the temples definitely smooths off the play experience, but at the expense of tension and variability. Why Defer Gratification? The central innovation of the game, and the hook that draws gamers to it, is that the effectiveness of your cardplay is affected both by what other cards you have, and also sometimes by the cards that your immediate neighbours have. So you are constantly looking to see what sequence of card play would be optimal, and hoping that the sweet 6 red cards that will super-power your pollution-clearing efforts will still be around next time it’s your turn.

You can also take your time to build Temples which will give you bonuses during gameplay and help when scoring victory points at the end of the game. Finally, you can build a Village and this is where most of your points are going to come from. Villages are great as they can give you bonuses and help get to the end of the game but humanity will always generate pollution. So, you will need to work out the right balance when it comes to setting up Villages on your board. Players may also send their wind riders to explore the area, plant forests or build villages and temples using all the gathered ressources. Build a village: if you meet the requirement (number of Wind Riders on a forrest tile) you will be able to flip the concerned tile on its village side. Beware, some villages will generate pollution in nearby territories, but they will also grant you very useful effects to help you fulfill your quest. They will also grant you a village card which you will be able to use either for its immediate effect, or as an end game objecive that will bring you a lot of points if you manage to meet its conditions. There are a couple of other aspects of the game which are also a bit unsatisfying. There is an element of assymetry- each player has a selection of powers that they can activate under certain circumstances. This is a potentially fun wrinkle, but unfortunately neither the triggering circumstances nor the powers particularly affect the game, and so because you have to do everything (moving, clearing, building) yourself, there’s very little benefit to specialisation. So this aspect feels very bland. Temple Of KludgePlayers may also send their wind riders to explore the area, plant forests, or build villages and temples using all the gathered resources. There's one more mechanism here worth mentioning, because it's potentially interesting but not handled here in a way that gets the best from it. When you complete a village, you draw a card and choose either an immediate bonus, or an objective which could maybe score you points at the end. This is potentially an interesting choice. The trouble is that the likelihood of these objectives being completed depends on the length of the game, and taking an immediate bonus will speed the game up. Therefore, the immediate bonus is almost always the best option. Again, Tribes of the Wind doesn’t quite use its ideas well enough. Just The Two Of Us (Preferably) During a game of Tribes of The Wind, you will be playing as a guide who can use their elemental magic to fight the pollution that ravaged the world. You will be growing forests, building temples and cities and securing the future of mankind. Sounds like an easy task right?

When someone builds their 5th village, the end of the game is triggered. The player with the most points, depending on pollution, villages, temples, layout of their forests, and other various objectives, wins! The Vincent Dutrait artwork sets the tone nicely for the game. The artwork on the cards is individual, some have a similar look but with subtle details swapped out that makes it fun to spot the differences. There’s one more mechanism here worth mentioning, because it’s potentially interesting but not handled here in a way that gets the best from it. When you complete a village, you draw a card and choose either an immediate bonus, or an objective which could maybe score you points at the end. This is potentially an interesting choice. The trouble is that the likelihood of these objectives being completed depends on the length of the game, and taking an immediate bonus will speed the game up. Therefore, the immediate bonus is almost always the best option. Again, Tribes of the Wind doesn’t quite use its ideas well enough. Just The Two Of Us (Preferably) The one that earned the more points, depending on villages, temples, objectives, pollution, wins the game and is now considered as the best of the Tribes of the Wind. Info Players will have to plant forests, build new villages and temples, and decontaminate surrounding areas.Each Guide in the game comes with a series of special abilities which can change gameplay and with five different guides to choose from, there is plenty of space for replayability. I do like a bit of asymmetrical gameplay! The aftermath of an apocalypse is an increasingly common grounding for games, both digitally and on the tabletop. Some (The Last of Us) take a narrative approach, where players act as a group of protagonists against a generally hostile environment. Others such as Dead of Winter introduce the possibility of deception and betrayal into the dynamic of survival. 2017's Outlive pitches you in direct competition with other bands of survivors, as well as environmental hazards. And then, there are games like Tribes of the Wind, where the destruction of human civilisation is included solely for decorative effect. Apocalypse Wow There’s a game design term, the kludge, which I love. It refers to an extra mechanism or rule which is added to deal with a problem elsewhere in the system. The temples in Tribes of the wind are the perfect example of this phenomenon. At some point the designer seems to have realised that you can end up with a real bummer of a hand of cards, stalling your progress towards sylvan Nirvana. Placing a temple allows you to jettison three cards (and immediately replace them) while gaining an immediate benefit. Which is fine, but it’s disconcerting to see the design ‘joins’ so clearly. The addition of the temples definitely smooths off the play experience, but at the expense of tension and variability. Why Defer Gratification? Villages provide victory points, while temples - not seen here - can be constructured for a one-off bonus.

I am concerned it won’t hit the table often enough to keep the iconography fresh, but that is probably my fault and not the game’s! Thinking about the description of the game so far, how many players do you picture- around the table? Three? This would be the ‘standard’ number of players for this game, allowing every player to have two neighbours. And it’s fine for three players. This might mean that you need to have a certain selection of elements in your hand to gain the benefits of the cards or own more of a particular element than those sitting to the left and right of you. It's a fun little puzzle that means you're going to be engaged with the other players around the table, always looking to see what they are doing and how. The aftermath of an apocalypse is an increasingly common grounding for games, both digitally and on the tabletop. Some (The Last of Us) take a narrative approach, where players act as a group of protagonists against a generally hostile environment. Others such as Dead of Winter introduce the possibility of deception and betrayal into the dynamic of survival. 2017’s Outlive pitches you in direct competition with other bands of survivors, as well as environmental hazards. And then, there are games like Tribes of the Wind, where the destruction of human civilisation is included solely for decorative effect. Apocalypse Wow The power of cards is affected by the cards of your neighbours - with the need to compare element types for most actions.The symbology on the cards is clear. I wish there was a reference card for the symbols, as a couple are quite similar and could be confused on early plays. Although once you are used to it, you find yourself reaching for the clarification less and less. If a period of time goes between plays I will certainly need a refresher! While the game’s unique card play mechanic adds a layer of strategy, it may not offer enough tactical depth for some players. The game’s focus on meeting certain conditions to play cards can sometimes limit strategic options, reducing the game’s tactical depth. Final Verdict: Tribes of the Wind A Game Worth Playing Playing a card is a crucial part of the game. Each card carries a cost, which depends on the types of cards in your hand and sometimes those in your opponents’ hands. Cards allow players to move wind riders to forest tiles, remove pollution from their player board, build forest tiles on unpolluted areas, and gain water, a vital resource for building forest tiles. Building Temples and Villages Each turn, players can perform one action - usually boiling down to playing a card from the row in front of them. These cards are colour-coded to four key elements: water, earth, fire and wind, allowing players to claim the vital resource of water, replant forests using said water, clear out pollution from squares on their board or move wind riders around (more on that in a second).

Once someone has completed 5 villages there is a final round and then each player scores points for the following Tribes of the Wind isn’t Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind: The Board Game, but it may as well be. The game’s eco-friendly theme resonates with today’s eco-conscious mindset. It sends a powerful message about the importance of caring for our environment, making the game more than just a source of entertainment. Worth the Investment Somewhat surprisingly, it’s better at two. The adaptation to this player count is to use the row of cards that you refill your hand from as one of your neighbours, for the purposes of powering your cards. This gives you a much greater measure of control, as the cards you and your opponent select doubly impact the cards in hand. It’s still not truly interactive, but it is more satisfying.But how do you convert a bombed out power station into a verdant treehouse? By following the following steps: There are a couple of other aspects of the game which are also a bit unsatisfying. There is an element of assymetry- each player has a selection of powers that they can activate under certain circumstances. This is a potentially fun wrinkle, but unfortunately neither the triggering circumstances nor the powers particularly affect the game, and so because you have to do everything (moving, clearing, building) yourself, there's very little benefit to specialisation. So this aspect feels very bland. Temple Of Kludge

Asda Great Deal

Free UK shipping. 15 day free returns.
Community Updates
*So you can easily identify outgoing links on our site, we've marked them with an "*" symbol. Links on our site are monetised, but this never affects which deals get posted. Find more info in our FAQs and About Us page.
New Comment